Why Chat when we can ‘WECHAT’?

I moved to Australia in February this year. The first thing I did after getting off the plane is asking the airport security if there is an app people use to book cabs. The security guy was slightly puzzled and said, “Well I guess there are, but there are taxis waiting over there. You don’t need an app.” So I asked him to recommend a few to me anyway for future reference but he couldn’t think of any. However he was kind enough to give me a number to call.

This came as a shock to me.  Back in Beijing, calling for a taxi is virtually non-existent. Even my grandpa has a Didi or Uber app. I then turned to my most trusted source of information center, WeChat and Weibo, to get to the bottom of this mystery. After posting a question within the day, I got all the information I needed regarding the best apps and websites.

Cultural Marketing to the Chinese in the Digital Age: Not just about WeChat

Do you have an active presence on WeChat that doesn’t seem to be working? Are you posting WeChat articles that are not effectively reaching the Chinese audience? Is having a WeChat subscription account enough to target Chinese audiences? A new age has dawned! Digital marketing for the Chinese audience has been changing while the world tries to catch up. Today, social video marketing (SVM) dominates the WeChat platform, like never before. SVM has always been a component of an integrated marketing communications plan, designed to increase audience engagement through social activity around a given video. It is now more important than ever to have authentic, raw and “live” video content for any campaign to be successful among the Chinese audience group.

New Year — New Strategies? New Audience buzz… Adland caught napping while bosses search for new revenue strategies!

This article was featured in B&T on 1 December, 2014. To read the full article, visit: http://www.bandt.com.au/marketing/customer-disruption-game-changers

First came the ‘digital disruption’ and now the ‘customer disruption’ – and it will short fuse those companies who are not willing to adapt their strategies to the changing market’s mood.

Five things you didn’t know about Holi

Much like any country has their iconic festivals — La Tomatina Festival in Spain, Oktoberfest in Germany or even The Carnival in Rio, India has Holi — the closest we Indians come to having a raucous public party. As this colourful and exuberant festival nears in 2013, we’ve compiled a list of top five interesting facts to get you up to speed:

Diwali — The Indian Christmas

Diwali or Deepavali is popularly known as the “festival of lights” and is the most important and biggest of all Hindu Festivals. It is like Christmas for the Indian community. For an Indian business owner it would be the start of a new financial calendar. The festival is normally marked by four days of celebration and literally illumines India with its brilliance, and dazzles all Indians with its joy. Each of the four days of Diwali is separated by a different tradition, but what remains true and constant is the celebration of life, its enjoyment and goodness.

The Origin of Diwali
Historically, the origin of Diwali can be traced back to ancient India, when it was most likely an important harvest festival. Some believe it to be the celebration of the marriage of Lakshmi with Lord Vishnu. Others consider it to be a celebration of the return of Lord Rama from exile.

Four Days of Diwali
Each day of Diwali has its own tale, legend and myth to tell. The first day of the festival marks the vanquishing of the demon Naraka by Lord Krishna and his wife Satyabhama. The second day of Deepavali, marks the worship of Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth in her most benevolent mood, fulfilling the wishes of her devotees. Amavasya also tells the story of Lord Vishnu, who in his dwarf incarnation vanquished the tyrant Bali, and banished him to hell. Bali was allowed to return to earth once a year, to light millions of lamps to dispel the darkness and ignorance, and spread the radiance of love and wisdom. It is on the third day of Deepavali that Bali steps out of hell and rules the earth according to the boon given by Lord Vishnu. The fourth day is referred to as Yama Dvitiya (also called Bhai Dooj) and on this day sisters invite their brothers to their homes and prepare a lavish meal for them.

The Significance of Lights & Firecrackers
The illumination of homes with lights and the skies with firecrackers evoke the blessings of the Gods for the attainment of wealth, knowledge, peace and prosperity. Another possible reason has a more scientific basis: the fumes produced by the crackers kill a lot of insects and mosquitoes, found in plenty after the rains.

The Tradition of Gambling
The tradition of gambling on Diwali also has a legend behind it. It is believed that on this day, Goddess Parvati played dice with her husband Lord Shiva, and she decreed that whosoever gambled on Diwali night would prosper throughout the ensuing year. Diwali is therefore  associated with wealth and prosperity.

From Darkness Unto Light…
In each legend, myth and story of Deepavali lies the significance of the victory of good over evil. Truth finds new reason and hope in the coming year. From darkness unto light — the light that empowers us to commit ourselves to good deeds, that which brings us closer to divinity.

A perfect time for marketing
Diwali is celebrated around the globe. Outside India, it is more than a Hindu festival, it’s a celebration of
South-Asian identities. Festivals are organised and celebrated in Australia too. These festivals are a great platform  for marketing to Indians. Practically every city in Australia has a Diwali fair with the Sydney Diwali Fair being held at Parramatta Stadium on the 30th of October. Come to the festival…we may just be able to do a Samosa (a popular Indian savoury) together or perhaps a Kaju Barfi (the queen among Indian sweets)!

By Sanchay Mohan